Summary of future projects.

  • Project Rock Wren

    We are in discussions with DOC about how we can evolve this project – intensive trapping around nests, detailed monitoring surveys to improve data accuracy and supporting scientific research into predator and bird behaviour. We will give more information here as soon as we can.

  • Project Routeburn

    We are in discussions with DOC about how we can evolve this project – intensive trapping around nests, detailed monitoring surveys to improve data accuracy and supporting scientific research into predator and bird behaviour. We will give more information here as soon as we can.

  • Braided Rivers

    We currently work in alpine and forested landscapes in the Routeburn and Hollyford face; we now want to expand our work to the braided Dart and Rees rivers that flow into Lake Wakatipu at Glenorchy. There are five bird species that use the rivers as a habitat and are vulnerable to introduced predators; two are nationally vulnerable, two nationally critical and one nationally endangered. We want to buy and install a new set of trap lines around the Dart and Rees rivers. In January 2017 we did a feasibility study which told us that this ambitious project is achievable. A detailed scoping study is close to completion. It will define the details of length of trap lines, numbers and types of traps and where to lay them. We will also do a baseline bird observation monitoring survey in the spring of 2017; it will be repeated annually to monitor progress. The length of the new trap lines will be approximately 130km. This is a very long term project; we propose to lay the new traps as soon as possible and then we will maintain and re-set them monthly.

     

    In March 2017 we started a new major fund raising campaign, launched by a feature article in the Otago Daily Times

     

    https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/queenstown/bringing-back-birds

     

    River photo

    Photo courtesy of Vladka Kennett

  • Predator Free NZ 2050

    This is an ambitious plan to rid New Zealand of the most damaging introduced predators (possums, rats and stoats) that threaten our nation’s natural taonga, our economy and primary sector. It will require new techniques and a co-ordinated team effort across communities, iwi, and the public and private sectors. Predator Free 2050 will deliver huge benefits across New Zealand – for the social and cultural links with our environment, for our regional economies through primary industries and tourism and for our threatened native species. Partnerships are being formed throughout New Zealand to achieve predator free communities. The Routeburn Dart Wildlife Trust is working with DOC and other conservation groups to achieve a larger predator free community in our region.

  • Education

    Part of our vision is to raise awareness of conservation matters generally and our own work specifically. We do this in two ways – though newsletters, social media and our website and by giving talks to local groups and schools. We plan to improve and increase all these actvities in the near future.

Current Projects